Media Kara-Suu (Кара-Суу)

Cope Artist

Cope Artist

Satire account
Nov 26, 2020
1,459
I can understand quite a lot of it, @Aedracel can you make out the words aswell?
 
Cope Artist

Cope Artist

Satire account
Nov 26, 2020
1,459
Which language are they singing? Mongolian? Doesn't sound Russian at all.
It is Altai Turkish. The original Turkish that was spoken ages ago is now lost, as Turkic people migrated and were influenced by different cultures, the language adapted to the changes. Turks in Central Asia were influenced by Russians over time, and that shaped their language. Most people in the Central Asian Turkic nations have two native languages, Russian, and a Turkic language depending on the country, such as Krygyz or Uzbek. The modern Turkish that me and @Aedracel speak is highly influenced by Arabic and Persian, but since all the Turkic languages share the same root, the sentence structure is the same, and some words remained unchanged.
In the song you posted, I could hear these:
Kara Suu would mean Black Waters, Su means water in Turkish, I suppose Kara had an entirely different meaning back then though, so not I am not sure about it.
Then it goes, ''içerim de ...'' meaning, I'd drink it and something would happen to me, I can't make that verb out though, it could be the Altai equivalent of ''rahatlarım'' which means ''I'd relax'', meaning I'd drink this water and I'd relax, feel at peace
I can also make out ''yüreğimde ...'' meaning ''... in my heart'', I think it says ''yüreğimde yarası'', ''it's wound in my heart''
I also hear ''dalgalar'' meaning waves, but can't make sense out of that sentence.
 
Last edited:
Cope Artist

Cope Artist

Satire account
Nov 26, 2020
1,459
Which language are they singing? Mongolian? Doesn't sound Russian at all.
Also the instrument they're playing seems to be Dutar, a 2 string string instrument, though I am not sure if it's related to the modern Turkish insturment ''saz'', however it does look very similar.
 
Aedra

Aedra

Funeral Attendant
Nov 26, 2020
1,369
@Cope Artist I can understand some of it but only a few words, I found a Turkish translation of it here Abi, şarkı güzelmiş.
Image 2020 12 20 140251
 
chudur-budur

chudur-budur

5'2" ugliest currycel, freak of nature
Nov 26, 2020
2,382
It is Altai Turkish. The original Turkish that was spoken ages ago is now lost, as Turkic people migrated and were influenced by different cultures, the language adapted to the changes. Turks in Central Asia were influenced by Russians over time, and that shaped their language. Most people in the Central Asian Turkic nations have two native languages, Russian, and a Turkic language depending on the country, such as Krygyz or Uzbek. The modern Turkish that me and @Aedracel speak is highly influenced by Arabic and Persian, but since all the Turkic languages share the same root, the sentence structure is the same, and some words remained unchanged.
In the song you posted, I could hear these:
Kara Suu would mean Black Waters, Su means water in Turkish, I suppose Kara had an entirely different meaning back then though, so not I am not sure about it.
Then it goes, ''içerim de ...'' meaning, I'd drink it and something would happen to me, I can't make that verb out though, it could be the Altai equivalent of ''rahatlarım'' which means ''I'd relax'', meaning I'd drink this water and I'd relax, feel at peace
I can also make out ''yüreğimde ...'' meaning ''... in my heart'', I think it says ''yüreğimde yarası'', ''it's wound in my heart''
I also hear ''dalgalar'' meaning waves, but can't make sense out of that sentence.
I see, that's why there are some words that sounds familiar to my language as well, we have many turkish loan words.
 
chudur-budur

chudur-budur

5'2" ugliest currycel, freak of nature
Nov 26, 2020
2,382
Also the instrument they're playing seems to be Dutar, a 2 string string instrument, though I am not sure if it's related to the modern Turkish insturment ''saz'', however it does look very similar.
Yea I know that instrument, we also call it dutar (du = two, tar = chord), I can play that instrument. We have another instrument called ektar (ek = one, tar = chord) which has only one chord. We have another very complicated instrument called sitar.



It takes years to master it.
 
Cope Artist

Cope Artist

Satire account
Nov 26, 2020
1,459
@Cope Artist I can understand some of it but only a few words, I found a Turkish translation of it here Abi, şarkı güzelmiş.
View attachment 2806
Even though I couldn't understand, the way words flow sounds familiar. It's sad that very few people actually speak Altai though.
Yea I know that instrument, we also call it dutar (du = two, tar = chord), I can play that instrument. We have another instrument called ektar (ek = one, tar = chord) which has only one chord. We have another very complicated instrument called sitar.



It takes years to master it.

It's great that you know how to play it. Most Turks have turned their backs to their culture, soon the traditional Turkish instruments will be mostly forgotten, at least here. How is it in India? It's really sad that one of the most fascinating cultures ever is seen as a joke by the mainstream media and the general western public.
 
chudur-budur

chudur-budur

5'2" ugliest currycel, freak of nature
Nov 26, 2020
2,382
Even though I couldn't understand, the way words flow sounds familiar. It's sad that very few people actually speak Altai though.

It's great that you know how to play it. Most Turks have turned their backs to their culture, soon the traditional Turkish instruments will be mostly forgotten, at least here.
Interesting coincidence, recently I heard this ancient Turkish song, and quite liked it, very similar to curryland music.


Specially when it's played on Rabab (Persian/Curry instrument)

How is it in India? It's really sad that one of the most fascinating cultures ever is seen as a joke by the mainstream media and the general western public.
We have a strong western American cuckerization happening for quite a long time, but most people still respect the ancient traditions and cultures.
 
Cope Artist

Cope Artist

Satire account
Nov 26, 2020
1,459
Interesting coincidence, recently I heard this ancient Turkish song, and quite liked it, very similar to curryland music.


Specially when it's played on Rabab (Persian/Curry instrument)


We have a strong western American cuckerization happening for quite a long time, but most people still respect the ancient traditions and cultures.

Damn. Never thought I'd hear this song on this forum. Check this version out:
 
Copexodius Maximus

Copexodius Maximus

Intergalactic Shitposting Abomination
Dec 2, 2020
1,702
Yea I know that instrument, we also call it dutar (du = two, tar = chord), I can play that instrument. We have another instrument called ektar (ek = one, tar = chord) which has only one chord. We have another very complicated instrument called sitar.



It takes years to master it.

I think satar means three chord in Persian, as seh = three.
 

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